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熱門!上班族EMBA敲開人脈大門

公告時間:2010-08-31

以法國的INSEAD為例,一般全日制MBA課程的費用是5.2萬歐元,供人在職進修的EMBA則要9萬歐元,EMBA課程通常是由學生的雇主負擔。不過,只因為企業的口袋比較深,學校就可以提高收費嗎?

有商學院院長指出,學生是關鍵因素之一。EMBA學生的年紀通常會比MBA學生多個十幾二十歲,他們對課程的期待較高,大部分EMBA學生已經知道基礎商業知識,選擇EMBA課程的目的是強化在目前公司中的能力,而非追求個人發展或轉換職業跑道。而講授這類課程不但困難,也得花很多錢。

EMBA學生希望教師不只懂理論,也要擁有實務經驗。有教授認為,這表示學校不只得從全球各地找來頂尖教授,還得找來受人信任的商場老將,包括曾經擔任過執行長的人物。

有些人認為,直接比較EMBA和MBA不見得合理。全日制MBA的學生必須離開職場至少一年,EMBA則可以繼續工作,這並不能解釋為何學校可以提高收費,不過,讓學生繼續工作對學生和雇主都有利。有位EMBA課程主任表示,不少EMBA學生在上完某堂課程之後,一回到辦公室便能學以致用。

或許,價格差異的最佳解釋並不是教學品質、教師素質,也不是其他各項成本,而是EMBA為學生開啟的那道門。比較誠實的EMBA畢業生承認,他們在商學院得到的最有價值的東西,並不是課程或是洞見,而是得以加入某個會員專屬俱樂部。全日制MBA讓學生成為初級會員,EMBA則給了學生一張高級會員的終生會員證。重要的不是你知道什麼,而是你認識哪些人。(黃維德譯)

轉載自 天下雜誌 http://www.cw.com.tw/article/index.jsp?id=41681
作者:經濟學人  出處:Web Only 2010/08


以下為經濟學人原文:

A costly lesson

If "executive" MBA programmes are not much different from their full-time counterparts, how do business schools justify charging twice the price?

IT STARTED with a little-reported court judgement in an American backwater. In 2007 Ruth Creps, a resident of Idaho, was made redundant by her employer. She applied for funds from the Federal Trade Adjustment Assistance programme, a scheme designed to help retrain workers who lost their jobs due to international trade competition. Ms Creps wanted to take an MBA at nearby Boise University, but decided that she would rather do the $41,000 part-time “executive” MBA (EMBA)—which is usually paid for by employers who are looking to train up their high potentials—instead of the full-time programme which cost just $14,000. When her request was turned down Ms Creps fought them all the way to the Idaho Supreme Court, only to lose because the court decided the more expensive programme was not significantly different from its traditional alternative.

The decision was seized upon by business education commentators and a debate began as to how business schools could justify charging so much more for their executive MBAs. At INSEAD in France, for example, a full-time MBA costs €52,000, while the EMBA comes in at €90,000. Where schools getting away with it simply because firms have deeper pockets than individuals?

Not surprisingly, there is no shortage of business-school types eager to defend the price differential. According to Jenny George, dean of Melbourne Business School in Australia, one of the key reasons is the profile of the students. Executive MBA participants tend to be ten or twenty years older than their counterparts on conventional programmes and have significantly more experience. Their expectations are correspondingly higher in everything from accommodation and catering to class size and style of teaching. Meeting those expectations costs money.

Indeed one of the biggest challenges facing executive-MBA providers is finding faculty that can hold the attention of such a demanding audience. Most EMBA participants have already learned the basic lessons of business and are on their chosen programme because they want better insight into the way they are operating within their present company, rather than for personal development or a career change. Such lessons are both difficult and expensive to teach.

EMBA students expect to be taught by people who not only have the theory but who also have demonstrable real-life experience. Sean Kilbride, a professor at HEC School of Management, Paris, says that this means flying in top professors from all over the world and recruiting business veterans with credibility, including former CEOs.

Some question whether it is even valid to make a direct comparison between an executive and a standard MBA. Paul Healy of the Vlerick Leuven school in Belgium points out that a full-time MBA takes students out of the workplace for at least a year with a consequent loss of salary. EMBA students, on the other hand, remain in employment and study part time. Looked at this way the difference in the cost to the student quickly shrinks—although this does little to explain why the school itself should charge more.

Nevertheless, having MBAs who remain in their jobs can produce benefit both for the students and the employer. Simon Learmount, director of the EMBA at Cambridge's Judge school, cites examples from his own class who applied classroom lessons as soon as they returned to the office, including one who concluded a lucrative deal with a Latin American client on the back of a cultural awareness class.

Perhaps the best answer to the question about price differential lies not in the quality of teaching or faculty or even in the standard of accommodation, food and wine. Instead, the premium comes down to the doors that an EMBA opens. More honest graduates admit that the most valuable thing they got from their business school was not any classroom lesson or insight, but membership of an exclusive club. And while a full-time MBA might give you access to the junior branch an EMBA gives you a lifetime pass to the senior common room itself. As Ms Creps's lawyers could have argued: it's not what you know but who you know.